Heaven Gallery and BOLT Residency present two solo exhibitions

Friday, January 17, 2014 - 6:00pm to 10:00pm

Center of the Circle: Sarah Belknap & Joseph Belknap +
Everything You Need Is Already Here: Stacia Yeapanis
Opening Reception: January 17, from 7-11pm
Exhibition Dates: January 17- February 16, 2014

Belknaps

An exhibition of work by Sarah Belknap and Joseph Belknap explores a shared experience with the cosmos, as described by the artists themselves:

“All of us grow up with the sense that there is some personal relationship between us, ourselves, and the universe.”
—Carl Sagan

The first meteorite we physically encountered was at the Hayden Planetarium. It was the Willamette meteorite- steeped in history, controversy and legend. We hugged it and it felt like magic and our hearts were won over and we started making work that looked at the cosmos. In this new body of video, photography and sculpture we try to recreate that magic- we are looking at the moon, meteorites, comets, the myths and romance they produce, and our love of the wild

Belknaps2
A solo exhibition by Stacia Yeapanis exploring repetition, desire and impermanence.

Everything You Need Is Already Here (2014) explores the spiritual predicament of desire, the presence of impermanence in everyday life and the possibility of responding to it with wonder and play, as opposed to anxiety. This solo exhibition brings together works from Specimens (2013), a series of pinned, shadowbox collages made of advertising images collected from glossy magazines, with an improvisational sculptural installation assembled on the floor of Heaven Gallery.

Stacia Yeapanis highlights the nature of impermanence in an installation that only lasts the length of the exhibition. One Day to Install (Heaven Gallery, Chicago) (2014) is inspired by the sites and relics of the human pursuit of a spiritual life—shrines and altars, mandalas, rock gardens and cairns, stupas, rosary beads, icons. The thousands of individual components, which will be reconfigured in future installations, are byproducts of the artist’s private meditation practice. The repeated gesture of coiling, winding, rolling easily-accessible materials, which results in an accumulation of empty centers, becomes an embodied metaphor for presence. Yeapanis selects both manufactured goods and collected detritus of her life as an artist, a consumer, a cultural participant and a waitress, because these materials represent an acceptance and engagement with what is, rather than a striving towards what should/could be.

Wild Dream: Reimagining the Ballet Russes/ Renovar Spring 2014

Saturday, December 7, 2013 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Ballet Russes Poster

Wild Dream: Re-imagining the Ballet Russes
Renovar Spring 2014

"We are witnesses of the greatest moment of summing up in history, in the name of a new and unknown culture, which will be created by us, and which will also sweep us away"
-Serge Diaghilev

The Ballet Russes was the impresario Serge Diaghilev's wildest dream. He created an art enterprise that manufactured excitement and celebrated modernism. His theatrical spectacles combined traditional narrative with emerging art, enabling him to promote his taste and making him reputable to his collaborators. He was neither a composer or artist, yet he managed to assert an unprecedented influence on art in the early 20th century.

Serge Diaghilev started his career as an art exhibitor, curating a show of 4000 works in St. Petersburg. He later was part of a collective that created the art journal Mir Iskusstva (World of Art) and held art lectures and discussions. Later he applied his curatorial eye to the ballet, in association with the migration of artists and nobility that fled Russia from the Bolshevik revolution, Diaghilev exported Russian culture and artists to Paris. In 1909 his Ballet Russes was a instant sensation, beginning his legendary collaborations with artists, composers, choreographers and fashion designers. Among his collaborators were Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Henri Matisse, Joan Miro, Leon Bakst, Sonia Delaunay, Jean Cocteau, Coco Chanel, Vaslav Nijinsky and Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. The Ballet Russes unification of all mediums made it much more than the ballet, with Picasso's cubism applied to set design and Chanel's simplicity to costume, it gained international fame. With glory also came controversy. Stravinsky's "The Rite of Spring", inspired by Pagan rituals to spring, met with outrage for it's primitive dance and jolting score that ignited the infamous riot in 1912.

Over a hundred years later the cultural phenomenon of the Ballet Russes continues to intrigue with exhibitions popping up all over the world. Recent exhibitions included, When Art danced with Music at the National Museum in Washington D.C 2013, Elegance in Exile:Between Fashion and Costume, the Diaghilev Era at the Palazzo Moceniza Museum in Venice 2011, Diaghilev and the Golden Age of the Ballet Russes 1909-1929 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London 2010, and Ballet Russes Art of Costume at The National Gallery in Australia 2010, all showcasing the elaborate costumes and visuals from the rich history of The Ballet Russes.

Wild Dream, Renovar's Spring 2014 collection gives in to the daydream of becoming a modern ballerina, inspired by the explosive and kinetic costumes of The Ballet Russes. While maintaining a contemporary context, Renovar pairs sumptuous blasts of color with whimsical styles to recreate spectacle. The costumes are both thrilling and shocking with bold geometry and dripping pearl
accessories.

$15 sugguested donation

"Night without Sleep" work by Jessica Bardsley, Gwynne Johnson and Ashley Thomas

Friday, October 18, 2013 - 6:00pm to 10:00pm

"Night without Sleep" work by Jessica Bardsley, Gwynne Johnson and Ashley Thomas

Night Without Sleep

work by Jessica Bardsley, Gwynne Johnson, and Ashley Thomas

Oct 18th- 27th

“… a shadow is a simultaneous memory…”

“From the outset, perception belongs to recollection.”

Night Without Sleep presents a world drawn in shadows, revealing the contours of our guiding drives, passionate attachments, and forgotten remains. Gwynne Johnson’s photographs and objects reveal the unconscious of domestic life through the rhythms of celestial and corporal bodies. Ashley Thomas’s noir-palette drawings and collages depict the objects of her fixation larger than life or swimming in darkness, while Jessica Bardsley’s constellation of archival film and photographs activates historical residue to trace the ocean’s haunted past. The artists of Night Without Sleep remake common objects and archival materials according to their memories, perceptions, and desires, illuminating the periphery of the visible, or quietly revealing what goes unseen by day.

Being a Woman in an all Women Show

Friday, September 13, 2013 - 6:00pm to 10:00pm

Women
Image by Laura Mackin

Heaven Presents "Being a Woman in an all Women Show"
18 women art exhibition

work by:
Marissa lee Benedict
Soo Shin
Sarah Weber
Bea Fremderman
Jessica Taylor Caponigro
Laura Mackin
Chelsea Culp
Ann Chen
Betsy O'Brien
Meg Duguid
Samantha Bittman
Robin Kang
Emily Green
Caroline Carlsmith
Kristina Paabus
Chloe Seibert
Selina Trepp
Ilene Godofsky

I have been accused of secretly wanting to be a man. This comment was made recently during a studio visit with a fellow artist, who saw how uncomfortable and wary I became as she steered our discussion towards gender politics.

I do not harbor the desire to undergo a sex change, but I also do not want to be seen solely as a female artist. It is from this position of defensive resistance in which I find myself "being a woman in an all women show."

There are many ways to experience discrimination in the art world; gender inequality is just one of them. To be defined by one's gender as a female artist is to be limited. A colleague recently brought to my attention the fact that the most reputable galleries here in Chicago all represent far more male artists than female. This inequality is made even worse when one realizes that our city's art schools are enrolling more women than men. An admissions counselor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago informed me that women compose roughly 70% of its student body. A woman can be trained (and pay for that training) as an artist, but it is not the same as her becoming one. "Being a woman in an all women show" is an effort to make up for this blatant discrepancy.

Not all artists consciously implicate their gender while making their work, and yet gender remains a determinant factor in how artworks are curated and disseminated. It seems unfortunate that an all-female exhibition is unusual enough to serve as a curatorial platform.

With this exhibition, Heaven gallery is pleased to exhibit the work of eighteen artists, who all happen to be women. These are good artists, not good-for-being-female artists. With this exhibition, let us hope that the exceptional work of each artist is seen as expected, and not a surprise.
Sarah Weber

Gallery Closed

Friday, July 24, 2015 (All day) to Sunday, July 26, 2015 (All day)

Closed due to Wicker Park Fest.

Mend Thine Every Flaw work by Shawn Creeden, Marshall Elliott and Rachael Starbuck

Friday, December 5, 2014 - 7:00pm to 11:00pm

Mend Thine Every Flaw work by Shawn Creeden, Marshall Elliott and Rachael Starbuck

ACRE has partnered with Heaven Gallery to host MEND THINE EVERY FLAW: works by SHAWN CREEDEN, MARSHALL ELLIOTT, & RACHAEL STARBUCK, the next installment in ACRE's year-long series of exhibitions by 2013 ACRE summer residents.

Mend Thine Every Flaw
An individual’s experience of the world is filtered through human scale and limited by human perception. In her work, Rachael Starbuck looks to the landscape as a site for understanding oneself and one's place. Our relationship to the natural environment can feel intimate because that relationship is based on our sensory experience, the touch, sounds, sights. However, the magnitude of the natural environment, the size of a mountain, or the vastness of an ocean contradict that perceived intimacy. Starbuck employs manageable, tactile moments in order to understand the world at large. Her work is often subtle and relies on humble, familiar materials. In her installation Starbuck presents two videos projected opposite one another in the gallery. In the first, Starbuck handles a sun made of plaster and paper pulp, rubbing it repeatedly and holding it in place of the actual sun. In the second, she handles a rock made of calcium carbonate, acrylic paint and glue, this time against her floral print skirt over grass. The positioning of these projections, the former high to the ceiling, connoting the sky and latter closer to the floor, connoting the earth, further connects each surrogate to its real life counterpart. Starbuck’s hands on these surrogates are an effort to physically hold or contain these monumental elements of nature in an attempt to close the distance between herself and the place they belong. Ultimately this gesture toward creating an intimacy in order to comprehend what is too large or too distant to comprehend is futile, however, Starbuck’s often repetitive, meditative process, and her presentation, in which subtle details are revealed with time, encourage contemplation from the viewer. A contemplative relationship with the environment, rather than a sensory one, may be a more intimate relationship after all.

While Starbuck revels in poignant experiences of our relationship to the landscape, Shawn Creeden’s work is occupied with the tools and techniques that humans employ in effort to control their surroundings and their experience of the world. In Creeden’s work there is an underlying question about how far humanity has gone to shape its surroundings and to what ends we understand the effects of that manipulation. Like Starbuck, Creeden also plays with scale, bringing the overwhelming travesties of pollution and the manipulation of the natural world to an uncomfortably intimate size. Utilizing traditional craft techniques and tropes of domestic spaces, Creeden’s approach opens up for a complex read on humanity’s struggle to define itself against the backdrop of its landscape throughout the ages. In his aquarium installation, Creeden creates objects that appear to be a formal exercise in minimalism or a dazzling color study. Their material components, however, include living algaes, some of which flourish dangerously in the runoff of industrial agriculture, while others are threatened by pollution and human activity or are exploited to our benefit. Similarly, Creeden’s embroideries present as gentle abstractions but take their lines and shapes from the original borders imposed on to the landscape of the American West. These borders, which seem innocuous in Creeden’s delicate abstractions, were a key part of the doctrine of Manifest Destiny and the conquest of the indigenous people, wildlife and land itself. Using the techniques of formalism and abstraction, which historically incorporate ideas of masking the author or master, Creeden highlights the keen manipulation of material by a human and uncovers the hidden histories and unseen destructions that come as the price for mastering the landscape.

Marshall Elliott’s use of the classical symbols of Heartland America hints at the ideology of self-identification through a relationship to place. Patriotism is a cultural attachment to one's homeland or devotion to one's country. Human’s have long expressed their devotion to their place through objects and symbols. National flags are probably the most universal symbol of this relationship and the American flag is a recurring motif in Elliott’s work. The traditions associated with the flag and the particularities of its use and handling are indicative of the way these symbols of patriotism are embedded in a sense of national and personal identity. In Retired Flag, Elliott dissects a retired American flag, taking each element and separating it from the whole. It is a gentle, reflective deconstruction, viewed as more of an investigation by the artist than an act of destruction. His process could be seen as very similar to the actual process of decommissioning an American flag in which the flag is disassembled and then incinerated, yet it differs in that he presents the disassembled flag for contemplation, standing in as a placeholder for a much larger concept of the country it stands for. Another recurring motif in Elliott’s work is the windmill. The American windmill played a major role in the ability for Western Expansion in the settling of the United States. Elliott plays with its history and significance by subverting its function in the video animation The American Windmill. Through his manipulation of symbols and objects that are considered truly American, Elliott’s work explores the strong human desire to take ownership of their place and the manufacture of that desire.

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MARSHALL ELLIOTT (born Eglin, Florida, 1976), lives in Oakland, CA and recently completed his MFA at the San Francisco Art Institute, where he won the Anne Bremer Memorial Prize. In addition to Bay-area galleries, he has shown work in Colorado, Oregon, and Nebraska with upcoming shows in San Francisco, Chicago, and New York.

More information about Marshall Elliott can be found at www.marshallelliott.com.

RACHAEL STARBUCK is an interdisciplinary artist from Miami, Fl working primarily with sculpture and video. Rachael received her BFA in Sculpture + Extended Media from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2011 and is currently living and working in Austin, TX. She has attended residencies at the Contemporary Artists Center at Woodside, ACRE and The Wassaic Project and has shown work in Richmond, VA, Chicago, Miami and Austin. She is currently enrolled in the MFA program at the University of Texas at Austin.

More information about Rachael Starbuck can be found at rachaelstarbuck.com.

SHAWN CREEDEN (born Newport, RI 1981) received his BFA from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2003. His work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally, including at The Headlands Center for the Arts (Sausalito, CA), Artists Space (NY, NY), Fontanelle Gallery (Portland, OR), The Filippo Gallery (Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, VA), Lamp Gallery (Tokyo), Grotto Gallerie (Brooklyn, NY), and The Manuel Izquierdo Gallery (Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland, OR). His books and multiples are held in the collections of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University, The Museum Library at MOMA, and the Cary Graphic Arts Collection at RIT. He has participated in artist residencies including Signal Fire (Portland/Gila Wilderness, NM), ACRE (Chicago/Steuben, WI), and Epicenter (Green River, UT). Creeden currently lives and works in Portland, OR.

More information about Shawn Creeden can be found at www.shawncreeden.com.

HEAVEN GALLERY established in 1997 is a non-profit arts space in Wicker Park that presents emerging artists and musicians. The gallery host 8-10 art shows and over 40 music shows a year. Heaven strives to make exhibitions and music shows accessible to the artist community by widely promoting its open proposal process. The visual art exhibitions are devoted to contemporary art, primarily sculpture painting and photography with a preference for simple smart art.

More information about Heaven gallery can be found at heavengallery.com.

ACRE (Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibition) was founded in 2010 with the ambition to provide the arts community with an affordable, cooperative, and dialogue-oriented residency program. The residency itself takes place each summer in rural southwest Wisconsin and brings together artists from across disciplines and levels of experience to create a regenerative community of cultural producers. Over the course of the following year ACRE endeavors to further support its residents by providing venues for exhibitions, idea exchange, interdisciplinary collaboration, and experimental projects.

More information about ACRE can be found at www.acreresidency.org.

For Heaven's Sake-14 Year Anniversary Benefit & Art Auction

Friday, June 27, 2014 - 6:00pm to 10:00pm

FOR HEAVEN'S SAKE
14 YEAR ANNIVERSARY BENEFIT & ART AUCTION
June 27th, 2014
7 PM
FREE

Heaven Gallery, the non-profit art space, is celebrating it's 14th year anniversary with the Annual Benefit & Art Auction. The gallery, established in 2000, has greatly contributed to the culture of Wicker Park, presenting emerging local artists in Chicago. Heaven hosts eight shows a year, most combining sculpture, painting, and photography as well as other non traditional media. Heaven strives to make exhibitions accessible to artists in the community by widely promoting its open proposal process. All of the art events are free to the public, this made possible by the help and generous support of our art community.

Music By Disco DJ Ayana Contreras

auction works by:

Doug Fogelson
Marissa Lee Benedict
Sarah Mosk
Ann Chen
Nicole White
Daniel Shea
Gwynne Johnson
Eric Fleischauer
Soo Shin
Patrick McGuan
Charles Fogarty
Laura Mackin
Elena Feijoo
Mike Kloss
Ron Ewert
Jessica Taylor Caponigro
Sarah & Joseph Belknap
Aron Gent
Leo Kaplan
Theodore Darst
Josue Pellot
Kristina Paabus
Kate Bowen
Morgan Sims
David Moré
Claire Arctander
Caitlin Arnold
Jesse Butcher
Bea Fremderman
Jacob Goudreault
Lauren Payne
Tara M.Hills
Scott Cowan
Robert Chase Heishman
Billy Joyce
Sterling Lawrence
Christopher Meerdo
Joseph Rynkiewicz
Stephany Colunga
Melissa Leandro
Virginia Aberle

A special thanks to all artist who donated

All funds raised will go towards supporting the art exhibitions and daily operation costs at Heaven Gallery.

Summer Boys Do it. Comedy with Johnny Pemberton

Monday, June 23, 2014 - 7:00pm to 10:00pm

Boysofsummer

Stand up Comedy
with
Josh Fadem (Key and Peele, The Eric Andre Show, 30 Rock, and Live Nude Comedy)
and
Johnny Pemberton (Kroll Show, Pound House, New Girl, and It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia)

Doors open at 8pm
Show starts at 9pm
$10

Advanced tickets available here

Stephanie Colunga trunk show

Saturday, June 21, 2014 - 4:00pm to 9:00pm

Bismuth, bones, brass, and bronze: COLUNGA combines everything from mixed metal to hand-grown crystals to porcelain limbs.

On June 21 at Heaven Gallery, creator Stephany Colunga will present COLUNGA’s first jewelry trunk show. Emphasizing the significance of one-of-a-kind pieces, displayed will be three collections; each themed and centered on a specific material.

*Hazel Bishop, a nod to the natural world, incorporates bismuth’s multifaceted aesthetic.

*Ode to Ernst alludes to the life and art of the great surrealist, featuring a patina techniques invented by Colunga, herself.

*Rarities brings Colunga’s focus on individuality full-circle with each piece including a unique found object.

All three collections highlight House of Colunga’s belief that jewelry isn’t just an accessory, but a treasured artifact.

"Give'em What They Never Knew They Wanted" Renovar Fall 2014

Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm

DVI

If Vogue is the fashion bible then Diana Vreeland is the high priestess. She preached style as a way of life and the importance of living beautifully, she said “a new dress doesn’t get you anywhere; it’s the life you’re living in the dress.”

The divinely quotable Vreeland was a magazine editor, fashion curator and life enthusiast. She was fashion advisor and lifetime friend to first lady Jacqueline Kennedy. Truman Capote described her “as one of the great Americans who had, more than anyone, improved the level of taste in American women” and former assistant Andre Leon Talley regards her as one of the most important women in his entire life.

Her impeccable appearance and grand manner was bewitching to all who knew her. Diana's was from a world of regalia, custom shoes, and fittings at courtier houses. This was a woman whose elegance extended to having the soles of her shoes polished and her dollar bills pressed.

Today, her signature epigrammatic style, her strong art direction, and attention to detail continues to inspire. At a time when costume was regarded by academics as too frivolous for serious examination, Vreeland said “Fashion is part of the daily air and it changes all the time, with all the events. You can even see the approaching of a revolution in clothes. You can see and feel everything in clothes.” Diana, recalling a Balenciaga show in the early 1960s: “One simply fainted. It was possible to blow up and die.” Although she was known to embellish, mixing truth with fiction, a term she coined as “faction.” The world she created was one of fantasy and splendor.

She wasn't a typical beauty but in the 1930's her style caught the attention of Carmel Snow, the editor and chief of Harpers Bazaar, beginning Vreeland's 26 year tenure at the magazine. She wrote a column, “Why Don’t You…” featuring style and fashion suggestions for the rich. The column was a personal credo: Why don't you be original? By the 60's, Diana would become editor and chief of Vogue, bringing the magazine to the fashion powerhouse it is today. Famous for her memos to models and photographers shooting on location, she directed fashion into fantasy to fill the pages of Vogue. She reigned there for almost a decade until she was fired in 1971, accused of being out of touch and having too expensive of an editorial style. At age 69, Vreeland began the most successful act of her career as a Special Consultant at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum. She curated 15 costume exhibitions including The World of Balenciaga, The 10's The 20's and The 30's, and Hollywood Costume. Her openings attracted celebrities, with lines out the door and turning the MET into a scene out of Studio 54.

“Give'em What They Never Knew They Wanted” tells the inspiring story of Diana Vreeland. Beyond the lacquered exterior and perfectly manicured talons lies the power to channel personal style and own it. The collection reflects Diana's love for Chanel, Balenciaga and Halston in luxury sportswear and exaggerated silhouettes. Presenting articulate clothes with alluring personality, Renovar captures Diana's sense of adventure with wildly chic animal prints, theatrical snuggies and a over-the-top kaftan jumpsuit that thrill to pure madness.

Renovar Fall 2014
8pm
$15
DV2

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